The Emergence of Structured Cabling as the Standard

By Telecom Tech Outlook | Wednesday, July 29, 2020

The word structured cabling describes how cables run within a building to efficiently distribute an information network to all the places in the building that would need connections.

Fremont, CA: The evolution of business networks has been in pace with that of the internet. In the early days, data flowed over phone lines, unbelievably slow compared to today’s standards. Networks evolved on an ad hoc basis, adding connections and cables without much thought to organization. Devices could be connected directly to each other within buildings, or across campuses via Ethernet cables, wherever a port or an Ethernet jack can be found. As business communications expanded to include file transfers, video communications, and multiple locations, requirements for bandwidth and speed expanded, and point-to-point connections made less sense. Businesses were now trying to cope up with the chaos of tangled cable connections, inflexible physical layouts, and strain on network connections running all over the place from an overburdened, inefficient array of servers, desktops, and wired phones. Top 10 Wireless Infrastructure Solution Companies - 2020

There was an urgent need for clarity and organization by developing standards for data centers. This set forth the foundational requirements for structured cabling. The word structured cabling describes how cables run within a building to efficiently distribute an information network to all the places in the building that would need connections. While structured cabling aims to bring uniformity, there may be a lot of variations from one design to another. This is mainly because of the difference between each location. The components used for structured cabling remain the same, but the design and variation for each site is adaptive based on the requirements of the location. Here are a few benefits of structured cabling.

Simplicity

Although each design is unique to its location and purpose, structured cabling still offers a level of consistency that makes the network setup easy to understand. IT professionals and installers generally tend to know where things are and how the network is configured.

Less Downtime

Because the standards for structured cabling have made them more predictable and organized, it’s easier for IT professionals to identify the source of problems in the network and to fix them, employing standardized troubleshooting procedures.

Bandwidth

Compared to older point to point connections, structured cabling offers a lot more bandwidth, and that too, more efficiently. Most contemporary systems use high-speed, high-capacity fiber optic cables with bandwidth to spare. The use of fiber optic patch cables at user endpoints keeps everything running at high speed.