The Future of Digital Infrastructure and Its Impact on Modern Society

Catalina Joseph, Telecom Tech Outlook | Friday, March 26, 2021

The network platform is at the heart of the digital infrastructure, capable of ensuring long-term competitiveness for enterprises while also meeting the full range of societal needs.

FREMONT, CA: The unexpected events of 2020 have highlighted the critical role that digital infrastructure plays in the performance of virtually every area of modern society all over the world. More than ever before, communication technologies are introducing better solutions to help address social, environmental, and economic difficulties by increasing efficiency and facilitating both increased network usage and more informed decisions.

The ability of digital infrastructure to bridge distances and make it easier to meet societal needs in terms of resource utilization, collaboration, skill transfer, status verification, privacy protection, security, and safety is one of its most important features. Other industries benefit from the communications industry's ability to deliver digital products and services, such as health care, education, finance, commerce, governance, and agriculture. It also plays an important part in tackling climate change by assisting other industries in reducing emissions and improving efficiency.

The network platform is at the heart of the digital infrastructure, capable of ensuring long-term competitiveness for enterprises while also meeting the full range of societal needs. It is a reliable solution that provides perseverance, privacy, dependability, and safety for all organizations – public, private, and everything in between. It also has the necessary scale, cost performance, and quality to support future innovations. Because of these characteristics, it is the most long-term solution to all future communication needs.

Future technologies will allow for a fully digitalized, automated, and a programmable world of interconnected humans, machines, things, and places. All experiences and sensations will be transparent across physical and virtual reality boundaries. Future network traffic will be produced not only by human communication but also by connected, intelligent machines and bots integrated with artificial intelligence (AI). As time passes, the number of data produced by humans will decrease while the percentage of traffic generated by machines and computer vision systems – including autonomous vehicles, drones, and surveillance systems – will increase.

The machines and other 'things' that comprise the Internet of Things (IoT) necessitate even more intricate communication than humans. Connected, intelligent machines, for instance, must be able to interact with the network dynamically. Sensor data will be used to aid in the development of prevalent cyber-physical systems made up of physical objects linked to collaborative digital twins. Support for the transfer of sensing modalities like sensations and smell will be added to future network capabilities.

The network platform functions as a streamlined universal connectivity fabric, with nearly limitless usability and affordability. It is capable of uncovering capabilities other than communication services, such as integrated computing and storage, and a distributed intelligence that provides insights and reasoning to users.