Three Factors to Consider for Antenna and Wireless Performance

Catalina Joseph, Telecom Tech Outlook | Wednesday, March 24, 2021

The antenna, its feed trace, and the radio transceiver should always work at the same frequency in order to achieve an effective transfer of energy from the radio to the antenna.

FREMONT, CA: In a wireless system, the antenna is one of the most critical components, so it must work effectively. Since the antenna's location is crucial for good wireless efficiency, it should not be a last-minute decision to place it inside the system.

The position of other components, influencing how well the system transmits and receives data, can also undermine the signal of the antenna. For good radio frequency (RF) efficiency, it is best to design part and architecture layouts. Here are three factors to consider:

Isolation

Most times, a design has more than one antenna, like a Wi-Fi antenna and a Bluetooth antenna. The signals from one antenna may interfere with or detune the other, so it is necessary to keep them apart from each other to prevent interference.

Transmission lines and matching

The antenna, its feed trace, and the radio transceiver should always work at the same frequency (typically 50 ohms) in order to achieve an effective transfer of energy from the radio to the antenna. If the frequency varies along this path, it can be addressed with matching circuits, such as π-matching topology, which can be tuned to carry the antenna and radio to the same frequency using lumped element inductors and capacitors.

Ground plane specifications

SMD antennas use a ground plane to radiate, and that has to be the correct size and length. To ensure that the antenna can work as it should in situ, follow the ground plane specifications mentioned in the manufacturer's datasheet.

Some SMD antennas are obtainable in left and right versions, and antenna designs for corner positions are accessible. One of these options can allow you to keep the antenna away from the individual and better suit the ground plane's requirements into a design.